Indigenous Voices: Justice for all

Being called Métis is plain to me, a representation of the hypocrisy hidden in Canadian democracy ever since 1763. This is why I represent my grievance poetically in order to represent it in the same language’s valency that justified this colony. Because we need new transparency in the constituency that is upheld by Canadian constitutional decree.

The apparently absent need for these issues’ relevancy to general society occurred to me in a class right before history. But, let it be clear that this is also about the acquittal of Gerald Stanley and current national reconciliations’ accuracy. Through historical and social degradation, accepted treaties’ revocation and rewarded predation, there resulted in an open condemnation relevant in townships with decoration featuring figures who violently furthered colonial occupation. Regarding my revelation, of this casually explained subjugation, I was witness to the demonstration of a person living in an ignorant nation.

A vigil for Colten Boushie was held on Feb. 12 in front of City Hall. (Jared Durelle/AQ)

The notion she raised left me amazed, at how this person I could see would not recognize that a scalp bounty was the open invitation to genocidal spree. She admonished me and defined her right of cultural history to save the statue of Cornwall, he who would have made Mi’kmaq people an irrelevant part of history. She would not see how it is a travesty for life to be lost and that she doesn’t live a life with the same cost, as for studying history, she simply glossed. I understand her thought is absent from the likes of Duncan Campbell Scott. The ignorance in her privilege is apparent with her afforded liberty, in a population that controlled people of a minority.

Living as an other because of the bloodline I carry through my mother has left me in pain over the death of another. Before you read about the vigil for Colten Boushie I ask for your empathy and that you share with me the pain of manufactured Aboriginal complacency.

The judicial ruling about Boushie is that he was a man who in the wrong place at the wrong time was tragically turned into history. The truth of his life is that he could have had a wife, he could have had a future, but still Colten wasn’t holding a gun when his mother lost her son. Colten was sitting down, one shot pierced his crown. Evidently, the resulting execution was meant to be as Stanley admittedly fired shots three, and subsequently five Natives were excluded from the jury. The rule of law is subject to that flaw as a man can walk and a people are left in shock. Colten wasn’t holding a gun when his mother lost her son. Colten was sitting down, one shot pierced his crown. Evidently, the resulting execution was meant to be as Stanley fired three. Why is Gerald Stanley not guilty when that was in his own testimony?

Colten Boushie faced injustice even after his death. (Jared Durelle/AQ)

Standing in the freezing cold there was some 150 bold who held solidarity with the unjust loss of Boushie to his family, a sentiment carried in movements nationally. They stood waiting while they could have been violently hating. They stood still while starting to grow ill. Flickering and fluttering their candles broke a cold bitter night with their dull starry light. By making a choice and upholding their voice these were the champions of reconciliations’ advocacy coming forth from a darkened sea. This evolution borders on revolution as change can’t be made in the shade. The shadow of ignorance and irrelevance to our body politic is absolutely diabolic. Beyond divinity is universality where a right to life is to all a guarantee. Where is this right when powers take flight and openly a man admits to using his might to kill Colten Boushie without a fight? Why is a nation who argues reconciliation not also arguing for abolition of systemic prejudices that leave devastation?

Even the national motto is written in colonial bravado “From Sea to Sea,” there lies manifest destiny, here remains hypocrisy and failure in Canada’s representational democracy. In equal representation led alliance and integration, we end segregation. Standing for choices and allowing voices to be heard and spreading their word. That investigating the missing and murdered should be furthered. That federal band joint economic development is relevant because it will circumvent the unnatural financial element which does prevent Indigenous people becoming present in economic achievement. That the residential projects are not simply objects, they were abominations to develop colonial domination. A complete violation of cultures, with Indian agents acting like vultures. They poached and coached aiming at keeping abused children hidden. While reservations run dry, there’s still a stereotype about Natives getting high. The real reservations are the powers that should be relinquished as lives are extinguished. These lights standing out in the nights are disappearing and you are here simply revering.

In finality, why choose inactivity?

Indigenous Voices is The Aquinian’s column featuring stories by Indigenous people, sharing their perspective on the world around them.

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